Archive for April, 2015

April’s Newsletter

April 7, 2015

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APRIL’S NEWSLETTER 

ATA’s 2015 season begins May 22nd through October 12th

Appalachian Trail Adventures (ATA) offers a distinctive adventure vacation with guided daily hiking, kayaking, and caving in the Green Mountains of Vermont that targets families and individuals who are adventurers, families, and those seeking an active vacation, including hikers who do not feel comfortable hitting the trails alone.

ATA provides an affordable all-inclusive hiking or fitness vacation giving a real Vermont outdoor adventure.  That’s why it has the best hiking vacation at the lowest possible prices, starting at $232.00 per night, per person, including taxes and gratuities.  Unlike most spas, ATA’s owner John Keough is engaged daily with the guests, encouraging them on the trail and kayaking.

ATA offers a variety of options to help customize one’s vacation. The most common is the Hiking Vacation that consists of an air-conditioned room with three daily spa meals, snacks, a guided novice, intermediate or advanced hike and an afternoon of kayaking, an excursion or caving. Massages, yoga classes and tennis lessons are available a la carte.

2015 Hiking Vacation Rates

Nightly rates are per person, including taxes and gratuity. The Hiking Vacation consists of an air conditioned room at the Summit Lodge with three daily spa meals; snacks; guided novice, intermediate or advanced hike; and an afternoon of kayaking, caving or an excursion. Massages ($75.00+), yoga classes ($30.00), tennis lessons ($70.00) are available a la carte.

Single

Occupancy

Double

Occupancy

1-2 NIGHTS $270.00 $245.00
3-6 NIGHTS $265.00 $241.00
7+ NIGHTS $259.00 $232.00

The Summit Lodge

Long considered Killington’s classic four-season resort hotel, the Summit Lodge is an ideal destination for your Vermont vacation that is why ATA has chosen it for their home base. Located in the heart of Killington, the lodge is situated high on a private knoll with magnificent views of Vermont’s second highest mountain and the surrounding Green Mountains. With eleven acres and forty-five comfortable rooms, the facilities and grounds are extensive including an outdoor heated pool, Jacuzzi whirlpool, saunas, weight room, five tennis courts, massage therapy, a library, two restaurants and bars, duck pond, game room, a bocci court, horseshoes and shuffleboard. A sit down breakfast and a bag lunch are supplied by the Summits chef, while dinner is served at the Foundry Restaurant.

The Foundry Restaurant

The Foundry Restaurant’s Executive Chef Sean Miller has created a delicious spa menu for ATA hikers who are seeking healthier meals. The menu is able to cater to special dietary restrictions such as vegan, low sugar, sodium-, wheat- and dairy-free options. This enables ATA to accommodate couples, athletes, weight loss vacationers, as well as all those with no dietary restrictions who seek to eat healthily.

Located on the banks of the Summit Pond, The Foundry offers a distinct year-round dining experience. In addition to the ATA hikers’ menu, The Foundry offers two menu options: an American Bistro-Style menu in its formal dining room, as well as a more casual Tavern menu in the bar. Their impeccable chef-driven cuisine provides guests the finest cuts of prime meats, fresh seafood, homemade pastas and much more. They use the freshest ingredients to create mouthwatering appetizers, flavorful side dishes and irresistible desserts, designed to engage all of your senses. The Foundry experience focuses on providing un-paralleled hospitality in a warm and relaxing setting. In addition to its dining options, The Foundry offers live entertainment regularly and is host to many of the area’s events.

Aeolus the beagle update:

At his annual exam, the veterinarian said that Aeolus was looking good and passed his medical exam with flying colors. Even though his weight was a few pounds over, it is nothing to worry about with hiking around the corner.   He is not like the picture I viewed online of an 80 pound beagle; I never would think of seeing a beagle that big. When down in the Boston area, we have been visiting the dog parks, but there is still so much snow, it’s level with park bench seats.  Aeolus did receive a new gift, a silent squeaking toy that only dogs can hear. It actually really worked.  I would go the other side of the house, squeeze it, and Aeolus would come running. It was really durable and set a record lasting for over three days before he was able to rip it open and remove the stuffing and squeaky part.

Aeolus is named after a cave where myself and a friend dug open a blocked passage discovering the largest cave in New England back in 2000. The cave is located just north of Manchester, VT and named after the mountain, Mount Aeolus.

Aeolus or Eolus (Greek: Aiolos [jjolos]), was the Custodian of the winds in Greek mythology. A minor deity, he is the son of a king called Hippotes, and lived on one of the rocky Lipara islands, close to Sicily. In the caves on this island were imprisoned the winds, and Aeolus, directed by the higher gods, let out these winds as soft breezes, gales, or whatever the higher gods wished. Being visited by the Greek hero Odysseus, Aeolus received him favorably, and on the hero’s departure presented Odysseus with a bag containing all the adverse winds, so that his friend might reach Ithaca with a fair wind. Odysseus did as Aeolus bid, but in sight of his homeland, having been untroubled by foul weather, he fell asleep and his men, curious, opened the bag, thus releasing all the fierce winds, which blew their ship far off course (Odyssey X, 2; Vigil I, 52).

Hiking Tip: Breaking in Your Hiking Boots

Different boots will require different amounts of break-in time. Lightweight models may feel perfect right out of the box, while heavier, all-leather models may require weeks to soften up and form to your feet. Most hiking boots stretch out slightly as they break in. But the break-in process will not turn a poor fit into a good one! Make sure the boots you buy feel snug yet comfortable before you take them home.

Begin  by wearing your boots for short periods of time inside the house. Wear the kinds of socks you’re likely to be wearing out on the trail. Lace your boots up tight, and make sure your tongues are lined up and the gusset material is folded flat. The creases you form as you break-in your boots will likely remain for the life of the boot.

Your new boots will be a little stiff at first, which is fine. But if you notice significant pinching, rubbing or pain right off the bat, you may want to take the boots back and try a different style.

If after several short indoor sessions your boots seem to fit comfortably, expand your horizons. Wear your new boots to the local store, around town or while working in the yard. Gradually increase the amount of time you spend in your boots and the distances you cover. Make sure your boots feel good at each stage before increasing your distance.

Be vigilant throughout the break-in process for any pain or discomfort. As soon as you notice either, take the boots off. Remember small problems can become big ones very quickly. If everything feels good, try adding a little weight on your back as you hike, and/or hiking on more challenging trails.

ATA’s Dvd Recommendation: Forks Over Knives

Focusing on research by two food scientists, this documentary reveals that despite broad advances in medical technology, the popularity of animal-based and modern processed foods have led to epidemic rates of obesity, diabetes and other diseases. 2011, 96 minutes

Healthful Living Tips: Eating

All humans have to eat food for growth and maintenance of a healthy body, but we humans have different requirements as infants, children (kids), teenagers, young adults, adults, and seniors. For example, infants may require feeding every four hours until they gradually age and begin to take in more solid foods. Eventually they develop into the more normal pattern of eating three times per day as young kids. However, as most parents know, kids, teenagers, and young adults often snack between meals. Snacking is often not limited to these age groups because adults and seniors often do the same.

Eat three meals a day (breakfast, lunch, and dinner); it is important to remember that dinner does not have to be the largest meal.

The bulk of food consumption should consist of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat milk products.

Choose lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, and nuts (with emphasis on beans and nuts).

Choose foods that are low in saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added sugars; look at the labels because the first listed items on the labels comprise the highest concentrations of ingredients.

Control portion sizes; eat the smallest portion that can satisfy hunger and then stop eating.

Snacks are OK in moderation and should consist of items like fruit, whole grains, or nuts to satisfy hunger and not cause excessive weight gain.

Avoid sodas and sugar-enhanced drinks because of the excessive calories in the sodas and sugar drinks; diet drinks may not be a good choice as they make some people hungrier and increase food consumption.

Avoid eating a large meal before sleeping to decrease gastro esophageal reflux and weight gain.

If a person is angry or depressed, eating will not solve these situations and may make the underlying problems worse.

Avoid rewarding children with sugary snacks; such a pattern may become a lifelong habit for people.

Avoid heavy meals in the summer months, especially during hot days.

Healthful Living Recipe:  Curried Chicken Pitas

Cranberries and pear are sweet counterpoints in this tangy curried chicken salad. Toasted sliced almonds add a nutty crunch.

6 tablespoons nonfat plain yogurt

1/4 cup low-fat mayonnaise

1 tablespoon curry powder

2 cups cooked, cubed chicken breast (see Tip)

1 ripe but firm pear, diced

1 stalk celery, finely diced

1/2 cup dried cranberries

1/4 cup sliced or slivered almonds, toasted (see Tip)

4 4- to 5-inch whole-wheat pita breads, cut in half

2 cups sprouts

Combine yogurt, mayonnaise and curry powder in a large bowl. Add chicken, pear, celery, cranberries and almonds; toss to combine. Fill each pita half with 1/2 cup chicken salad and 1/4 cup sprouts.

Tips: Make Ahead Tip: Cover and refrigerate the salad for up to 2 days.

If you don’t have cooked chicken, poach about 12 ounces chicken breast for this recipe. Place boneless, skinless chicken breast in a medium skillet or saucepan. Add lightly salted water (or chicken broth) to cover and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low and simmer gently until the chicken is cooked through and no longer pink in the middle, 10 to 15 minutes.

To toast sliced or slivered almonds: Place in a small dry skillet and cook over medium-low heat, stirring constantly, until fragrant and lightly browned, 2 to 4 minutes.

ATA’s Recent Press Release

Vermont’s premier hiking spa Appalachian Trail Adventures announces an affordable hiking and kayaking vacation for the spring, summer and fall, please visit PRWEB to read the release

ATA’s Facebook & YouTube Links

ATA’s Facebook page helps guests keep in touch and recommend us to their friends. Check out ATA’s Facebook Page for weekly photos, videos and our YouTube Page.